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Remember the Rainforest 1

 

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A thick forest, with gigantic groves, mixing with new shrubs and many palms, and, sometimes, so closed, that in full clarity of the day, it is in the dark.

The soil, almost all covered with rotting vegetation, especially of loose roots, greatly favors the development of plants that are all its own; We noticed many colossal leaves, reeds and huge head mushrooms, which, alongside the red Helosis, strangely similar to the phallus, characterized the smell of these virgin forests, full of humid emanations.

Etching 30

The Indians were not careless about harvesting, whenever they could, the fronds of the Ubucu Palm, whose fibers make purses, bags and hoods. This palm tree has its flowers on a long stick, woven with strong brown fibers, which serve for these simple mysteries, in the most satisfactory way.

Manicaria saccifera

At the beginning of pouring rain, after noon, we continued to travel, always in the neighborhood of Marajo. Then we were on our way at 5 hours in the morning, following the mouth of the Mapua River; Heading in general to the north, on this path, we sighted to our left many islands, covered with dense forest, but we did not stray from the canal, which almost always is only 300 to 400 feet wide. Indians were already here making an effort to paddle out of the reflux of the receding waters.

Receding water

We were able to evaluate the pressure that characterizes the waters of the north, this and, those of the Amazon, in the southern direction, not only in the High Tide, but also in the low-sea. We were thus convinced that this king of the rivers joins the ocean only after making a strong curve around Marajo island. Then we observed this High Tide rigorously, 1 hour after the strongest leak, when our vessel was anchored at the southern end of an islet. So we saw the waters grow along the two sides of the island, at a minimim rate of 2 ½ to 3 miles per hour, coming to where we were, and from here continuing south; A unique spectacle in general and one that we observed with great admiration, because also the vegetation of the shore was bathed by the waves, shaking its branches and dropping its flowers, while the rest of the forest remained motionless. We find, here already in Tagipuru (Tagypuru and Tajupuru), one of the canals, interrupted by many islands, between the Amazon and the river of the mouths, although many people of Para designate only the main canal to the north with this name, in that it navigates in the direction to the northwest, and is lost in the Amazon north of the Gurupa Islands.

Little by little, we watched the waters become wider, and they took tint of the Amazon by pulling in the yellow waters.

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