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Remember the Rainforest 1

 

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Neither a big mouth nor teeth were lacking on these faces, and bright white was the fundamental color. Another one appeared entirely wrapped in a bag of Turiri, painted in the most extravagant way: he had a mask, which was a head of tapir, four feet high and the snout mimicked the look of a tapir, when it snorted on the floor.

Festival costumes

For the addition of the Algazarra, they followed a beat, here and there, of a small drum (Oapycaba), made of Morototo wood (Panax morototoni),

and finally one of them mimicked the chief with great enthusiasm, whose wiggles produced piercing rattles. They created these barbaric sounds for the dance of war, which was then executed by the leader himself, with his best warriors.

They hid behind the great round shields, of tapir leather, which they used to swap with the Miranhas, and cast the dart with threatening gestures, marching from one side to the other. This dance offered a savage and fierce picture of the American Indians with their bodies painted for war. An odious figure of savagery was represented by this rapidly revolving menace of naked bodies, the horrendous character of the faces tattooed red like the vulture, and by the sudden cry when launching the dart and the dart hitting its target.

During the dances, some Indians set fire to a small bush of trimmed grass, which included a clump of hedges. The hedges burst, when the air within them reaches a certain degree of heat, and produce so terrible a crackling, which, at the first moment, resembled a shooting in the vicinity. These “Taquarucas”, or green fences, are so thickly woven, that one could hardly make way between them;

And the Indians said they were remnants of an ancient fortification strengthened with concrete. This mixture contained small rocks and purified water, which little by little thickens to a gel, and then turns to stone (Tabaschir). I was not able to get one of those hardened rocks. The Indians are afraid to drink the purified water, saying it creates a stone in the bladder. The water was five to six degrees R. cooler than the atmosphere, with a fresh flavor, like dew. It was almost midnight, when I hung my hammock; But the noise of the dance, which lasted until morning, only let me sleep 1 hour. I felt weakened by the terrible spectacles of that day, and the fatigues of the journey under incessant rain and painful work. When, therefore, I woke up weakened and indisposed, fearing the onset of a fever, I immediately treated myself by vomiting, which relieved me.

We departed from Uarivau, after we replaced the Indians who had fled or were left behind, and we went on a trip in seven boats, accompanied by more than 60 men, by the river above. Among all these people, only those we had brought from Ega appeared healthy with good color; All the rest were pale or jaundiced, and, even more horrific highlighted by the face mesh. Most of them

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