next arrow
previous

Remember the Rainforest 1

 

Home

Expedition Index

Itinerary

Etchings

Maps

Plants

Animals

People / Scenes

Lessons

Green Girl's Eco Club

Eco SuperHeroes RTR2

Free Posters

Authors / Artists

Contact us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


from the white sandy ground, and various groups of Cacti, Acacias, Mimosas, Bauhinias and Combretas, transformed the region into a true English park, through which, relieved after the adventure of the night, we traveled in a joyful mood.

Opuntia stricta, cactus

Acacia fasciculata

Bauhinia

Combreta purpureum

The Serra Branca Farm, picturesquely situated on the slope of the mountain of the same name, welcomed us in a hospitable way, and the owners, people of

Serra Branca

natural kindness and simple customs, never tired of asking foreigners about their homeland, of which they had the most extravagant idea. The next morning, the farmer wanted to help load the mules; When we were about to leave, however, we missed Miguel, whose absence had not been noticed before. After being sought for a long time, he was found near the farm, lying under a tree, in a state of apathy and a little out of his mind. Asking him what happened, he answered that he thought he had been bitten by a snake in the tall grass when he went to fetch the mules. In terror we noticed on both sides of the big toe small wounds that, from the swelling, seemed to be due to poisonous snake bite. We immediately gave him large doses of Luce Water, a mixture of liquid ammonia with volatile sucino oil diluted in potash solution; We scarified the wound by burning it with gunpowder and then with a red-hot wire, and did everything to settle the patient more comfortable. His finger was slightly swollen, his pulse was of unusual violence; his eyes, half closed and bloodshot, were still; the voice was trembling and weak; the patient complaining of painful limbs, dizziness, and backache, was prostrated in extreme dejection. He seemed to have a fear of death, for he unwillingly underwent medical treatment, and just wanted to be reassured. Apparently, the haggard man had been stung for many hours, and the terrible effects of the poison were already reaching the center of life, in that sturdy, large body. Following the advice of the farmer and the patient's will, we decided to leave him here until his complete recovery, being customary to calculate at 14 days the time required for treatment, which was incompatible with our travel plans. We send for a healer, we left him medicines and the prescriptions, and we thanked God for the humanitarian sentiments of the friendly farmer. Unfortunately, all these precautions were missed, because a few days later a news came to us from a drover traveling the same road that the poor man had succumbed that very day. This tragic event probably started the rumor that one of us had been victimized; this rumor spreading

259