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Remember the Rainforest 1

 

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Trochilidae, the hummingbird family

Hummingbirds buzz more, like bees, in the flowering shrubs; motley butterflies

Papilio ascanius

flutter around the whispering fountains; countless wasps fly in and out of their long nests, hanging from the trees; great hornets swarm over their potholed houses. Pass the crested flycatcher, bearded, the small hawk,

Falco aurantius, small hawk

and the rust-red or painted pygmy owls which, in the midday heat, lies ambushed among the sunlit branches, hidden away waiting to catch small birds and insects; the zabels (jaos) walk slowly between the feet of the pineapples; the enapupes and inambus walk around the grass; lonely toucans leap among the

Toucan, Rhamphastos cuvieri

branches in search of berries, and tanagras, glittering purple with loving intentions jump from tree to tree; the caracara and the caracai accompany them,

Caracara, the peregrine falcon

on the way, flocking around the cattle or the freighter mules, resting on their backs to rest; however small picancos climb the trees above, and look for insects

Picanco

in the bark; the Joao-de-barro carelessly mortars his house in the shape of a very

Joao-de-Barro, Furnarius rufus

low oven among the branches; the climbing bird, similar to the goldfinch, the Joao-de-pau (Scalpole Woodpecker), insensibly, from his abode, built the fashion of the pigeons with nets many feet long, hanging from the branches, multiplies, for each year a new compartment; Quietly, he looks at the

Joao de Pau, woodpecker

from the top of the tree, peering around at the snakes, even the poisonous ones he eats, basking in the sun on the way, and at times letting out his harsh, almost human cry as soon as he sees people. The region's quietness is very rarely interrupted, when parrots and parakeets (maracanas, maritacas) take off in a

flock of corn and cotton farms to land on the small trees of the field and shouting stridently still seem to fight over the prey they made; the flocks of crested anus rest close together on the branches, and with loud squawks defend the nests full of turquoise eggs. With such noises, countless families of turtle doves, sometimes sparrows, fly, frightened by the travelers from thicket to thicket, and

Mourning Dove

the larger doves (bitter and cheery), scratching the ground, hurry restlessly to fly to the highest tops of the neighboring bush, where the splendor of its metallic plumage flaunts in the sunshine; countless flocks of monkeys, small marmosets

of Bahia scream and whistle, running back to the undergrowth, and the mocks that walk along the crest of the rock quickly hide among the scattered stones; and American ostriches (emas), which graze together in families, gallop at the slightest noise, like horses, snapping branches, over hills and valleys, accompanied by

Etching 21 Ostriches on the burning meadow

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