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Remember the Rainforest 1

 

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we were forced to empty it, although feeling disgusted, following the advice of our guide, because it was not appropriate to arouse the distrust of the Indians. The drink tastes similar to our barley beer; taking too much of it is intoxicating, an effect that at the end of the party was noticeable from the jumbled leaps and the rambling exclamations. They had given us the hope of witnessing also on this occasion the dance of the Coroados; but at night, with their heads and stomach full, the Indians dodged out, group after group, as if they had agreed on their exit.

Guidoval

On the day of our arrival in Guidoval, a band of Puris had appeared there, wandering on these sides. They crept shyly around the houses; After all, they gained the courage to come in, after we offered them some gifts, to earn their trust and cooperation. It was soon apparent that they were more dumb, but even less suspicious than the Coroados, who had long been subject to the Portuguese.

Puris dance

During the drunken feast, they were hidden in the bush of the neighborhood; When the party was concluded, they were called by our guide, and they approached him late in the evening, after the Coroados had all gone to their huts. They were naked, such as nature had created them. Some women had snakes drawn on their arms and other figures in black and red ink on their faces. The innate feeling of shame made them hide behind men, or cross their legs. We gave them pins, ribbons, sun dials and tin soldiers, etc. They tied these toys with wires around their neck

After having received these gifts with joy and longing gazes, they felt the heads, mouths, feet of the tin soldiers' horses, and it seemed that they were gradually convinced, examining and feeling them again whether they really existed or were imaginary. After abundant rum libations, which they, like all Indians, passionately appreciate, they became confident and excited, and performed their dances at night in a deserted place not far from Guidoval Farm. Earlier they had awakened in us the most unspeakable compassion for the physical embarrassment of this portion of humanity, the hooded bearing, the reddish brown of color, the charcoal black of shaggy loose hair, the ugly shape of the broad, angular face, and the eyes, small, oblique, restless, finally the short, elusive walking of these men in the jungles. And then, in the melancholy of this party, in the darkness of the night, our impression of pity was even greater. The men set themselves

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